Beer Brewing Exhibit

The Johnson-Humrickhouse Museum’s Breweriana exhibit is one of the largest displays dedicated to the history of beer in America. Consequently, the exhibit is a must-see, not only for its historical value but for its wonderful graphic art. The special exhibit Breweriana—Preserving the History of the American Brewing Industry portrays America’s brewing past through industry packaging and advertising over the past 130 years.

The diversity of items will quench your thirst for beauty, history, wit and comedy. Coshocton County is eminently suited to host such an extensive and unique display of brewing advertising.

The specialty advertising industry was launched in Coshocton in 1884, and in 1890 a Coshocton company developed the process of printing on metal. Their biggest customer was the beer and whiskey manufacturers. Artists and lithographers flocked to the town to paint the illustrations—handsome couples, smart dogs, beautiful women and funny people—all drinking beer. They also showed how prosperous the breweries were by the plume of smoke blowing from their stacks.

The term “Breweriana” refers to any article containing a brewery name or brand name, particularly collectibles. Hundreds of breweries will be represented by a wide array of objects from tin signs and trays to cans, bottles, coasters and taps. Most of the breweries are long gone, but visitors will recognize the names of the cities and small towns where they once thrived.

Hot Air Balloon Festival

Hot air balloons are a testament to science and human ingenuity that still inspire awe in people young and old despite their reliance on scientific principles which may now seem quaint.

The first untethered and manned hot balloon flight took place in the fall of 1783 in Paris and was captained by Jean-Francois Pilatre De Rozier and Francois Laurent d’Arlandes. The balloon was created by the Montgolfier brothers. The first American flight was undertaken by Jean Pierre Blanchard at the Walnut Street Jail in Philadelphia.

The hot air balloon is the first known aircraft to carry a person—this spirit of human flight is carried on in part by the annual All Balloon Festival.

First held in 1975, the All Ohio Balloon Fest is one the longest-running occasions of its sort throughout the entire existence of the United States. Every August, 30,000 guests of any age accumulate at the Union County Airport in Marysville, Ohio to appreciate sustenance and product sellers, melodic excitement, kids’ exercises, helicopter, plane and inflatable rides, and sky bouncing notwithstanding a wide assortment of conventional and unique molded tourist balloons. Inflatable flights and inflatable gleams are day by day features you won’t have any desire to miss. A non-benefit occasion, all returns from the fest are given to United Way of Union County.

Topiary Garden, Old Deaf School Park, Columbus, Ohio

The Topiary Garden Park is located in downtown Columbus in the Discovery District and is built on the site where the Old Deaf School Park used to reside. Though it has become known by its new name the park dates back to the early 1800’s, when it was part of the campus of the adjacent Deaf School.

Today the Topiary Garden of Old Deaf School Park is one of kind—not only in the state or country, but in the world.  The garden is a living model of Georges Seurat’s post-Impressionist painting called “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of LaGrande Jatte”.

It would be many years after the painting in 1989 when Columbus native and artist James T. Mason and artist Elaine Mason, James’ wife would conceive of and sculpt the 3D, living model of Seurat’s painting. The artificial pond (meant to be the river Seine) and the artificial hills were installed later in the year after the sculpting was complete.

In the years since its inception the garden has been the subject of numerous articles, books and documentaries. It has been covered by Life, The Wall Street Journal the BBC and National Geographic.

The recommended viewing season is April to November as this is when the garden is in full bloom.

 

Youngstown Historical Center of Industry and Labor

Ohio was a center of manufacturing for the U.S. in the 19th and especially the 20th century because of our rich resources. You can learn about the steel industry that was such a part of our culture, especially in Youngstown, Ohio. Additionally, you can check out the so-called “last heats” or final batches of steel poured at each of the mills before their closings. Experience all this and more at the Youngstown Historical Center of Industry and Labor.

One feature of the museum is its photography collection—the varied subject matter of the photographs detail the culture of labor, immigration and urban history. Artifacts include workers clothing and tools. Other photographs are life size and recreate scenes from urban life, such as a mill locker room, a company-built house and the work floor of a blooming mill. All of this is intended to help visitors understand the lives of steel workers and their profession.

The Historical Center also offers educational programs and there is access to the archives and library. The archives are a node in the Ohio Network of American History Research Centers and includes government records, manuscripts authored by workers, companies and labor organizations.

The historical center is managed by Youngstown State University.

Visit A Civil War Era Iron Furnace

At the Buckeye Furnace in southeastern Ohio you can see how pig iron was made during the Civil War era. The furnace is a recreated, charcoal fired blast furnace. This is just one of many that once operated in southeastern Ohio in the Hanging Rock Iron Region. Visitors will learn how these so-called iron making towns helped win the Civil War for the Union.
This 270-acre site contains lots of things to explore. The furnace is the main attraction. It was originally built in 1852 and went cold in 1894. There are other reconstructed buildings and a museum to visit. And if you’ve still got the energy the site has beautiful nature trails to explore.

After the down slide of salt0making in the area (from about 1795-1826) the local economy defaulted to agriculture. Despite the fact that natural resources were abundant in the area no one was taking advantage of them. Specifically, there were isolated parts of southeastern Ohio with iron deposits. This of course led to a limited production period of iron. Between the 1830s and 1840s a total of sixteen furnaces were built to take advantage of these resources.

While several of these original furnaces still stand, Buckeye’s is the only one that remains as it was during its operation.